A freKart Customer Interviewed by http://indianonlineseller.com/ [Seller Interview] Making online jewellery brand Kriaa & scaling up to 50,000+ orders per month – Ritesh’s ecommerce journey

A freKart Customer Interviewed by http://indianonlineseller.com/

[Seller Interview] Making online jewellery brand Kriaa & scaling up to 50,000+ orders per month – Ritesh’s ecommerce journey

 

 

ritesh

From manufacturing to wholesaling to exporting to retailing, Tip Top Group seems to have explored 360 degree of the imitation jewellery market. How calculated was the move to ecommerce? Or was it a natural next step? Let’s ask Ritesh N. Barbhaya, the 37-year old founder of Mumbai-based online brand Kriaa.

tip top1

Why did you choose ecommerce?

Since we were already established in the retail sector, we got a lot of enquiries from various sellers and marketplaces to sell on ecommerce platforms. So it was very natural for us to dive in.

Since retail MRP and ecommerce selling price points vary, we launched a purely ecommerce brand ‘Kriaa’ to differentiate, in 2012.

We started selling on eBay and rediff with low ticket imitation jewellery. The initial lines were the same retail SIS line products that were already being sourced for retailing.

How easy or difficult was it to start off?

Logistics and in-transit product damages were the main challenges when we started out, resulting in customer grievances. We had a few instances of our eBay account being suspended for negative ratings. This taught us a lot in better packaging options that are currently being employed.

Retail journey – Quick look

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So it was a wise move?

Yes, because in 6 months time, before the festival season of Diwali, we got a lot of marketplaces scouting us to join them and offer virtual inventory to them for drop shipments, that gave us confidence that we were on the right track of growth. We are now selling through most of the major marketplaces like Flipkart, Snapdeal, Amazon, Shopclues, HomeShop18, Naaptol, ShopCJ, Rediff, AskmeBazaar, Craftvilla, etc.

So far, our best experience has been with ShopClues where the merchandising team worked very passionately with us and we have been able to execute over 50k+ orders in 2015 so far.

  • Over Rs 2 crore revenue per month
  • 1000+ orders in ecommerce + 800+ orders in TV home shopping per day
  • 50000+ orders per month

We want to grow to over 100k+ orders this Diwali season onwards.

How do you manage inventory?

Since shipping time is very critical, usually between 24-48 hours, the entire inventory is stocked, QC done and kept ready for dispatch. We currently have over 3000 designs in stock with quantity per SKU ranging from 10 – 1000 per style/colour.

Our own website www.kriaa.in went live in August’2015 and we currently have about 3k+ products live on it.

What challenges do you foresee in running your own online store?

The biggest challenge would be advertising and marketing.

With the kind of money that the bigger players have with them to burn, we would not be a killer force against them. We will have to device specific and niche plans to gather a loyal customer base.

We want to focus on consumer experience wherein we can facilitate styles getting created as per their choices. We want to allow customers to dictate the manufacturing of products from a pool of possible choices, eventually getting to a completely customized solution made according to international standards but economic and of value.

So it’s going to be just your store in time?

Both the verticals will continue to co-exist. Marketplaces will have more curated product lines as per their customer bases while our web store will have everything that we want to showcase to the world.

Have you had to use any marketing channels?

We use facebook and sms marketing but it’s too early to assess their effect. Also, we have partnered with some of our customers who do exhibitions or have their own outlets. We offer high sales commissions and accept unsold stock once the event is over. We find that this sales vertical is an untapped opportunity as we get 5-10 new customers per week that can be scaled to over 100 a week. It helps to push our website when they want to restock old designs and add new ones to their portfolio.

Any particular instances that you consider as turning points in your ecommerce business?

The biggest leap happened in August 2014 when we launched our first celebrity line of affordable jewellery under our brand name of Mithya by Mahima Chaudhry exclusively for Snapdeal. It was a great success; we were able to sell over 7000+ orders in 25 designs in total. No other company had ever done that in the imitation jewellery segment.

We were directly catapulted in the big league where the heads of categories were getting in touch with us to get exclusive rights for future collections and giving us home page space to showcase our product lines which traditionally never happened in imitation jewellery.

This category suddenly came into the spotlight for many marketplaces. After that we did more celebrity-endorsed collections with Gauhar Khan exclusively with Snapdeal. We have another collection ready for release now, shot with Mahima Chaudhry.

What aspect of your product or business requires most attention from you?

Unarguably, the quality! We have always believed in providing the best international quality products at economical prices for customers. We have invested heavily in Lead free (Zinc alloy based), lightweight, non-allergic materials for our entire product line, with selling price ranging from Rs 49-1999. The key is in building customer loyalty to our brand with great designs at affordable pricing.

Ritesh feels they have reached a stage where there is no benchmark as such except the ones they set and reset for themselves. He advises the budding online sellers to keep learning from mistakes and pushing towards goals. Considering the success his family and he has had, we are inclined to heed his advice, and maybe so should you.

 

Source : http://indianonlineseller.com/2015/09/seller-interview-making-online-jewellery-brand-kriaa-scaling-up-to-50000-orders-per-month-riteshs-ecommerce-journey/?utm_source=IOS+subscribers&utm_campaign=7fadbc46f8-Seller_Survey8_8_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_906ecc1167-7fadbc46f8-61272057

Facebook report Site URL has been identified as malicious and/or abusive

 

facebook-brands

Facebook report Site URL has been identified as malicious and/or abusive,

If you have abuse any of the guidelines of facebook https://www.facebook.com/ad_guidelines.php

Here is a form for appealing blocked content (in your case URL). However there are very few chances of getting unblocked your URL but still you may try this form and hoping to get reply from Facebook. In any case if your URL is unblocked there is a high probability that your future users will see a captcha when visiting your app from mobile devices. So I can recommend to change the URL and continue developing with other URL.

https://www.facebook.com/help/contact/244560538958131

Different types of Bounce mails.

This list is provided by sendthem.net it’s a Manage Bulk Email blasting services for promotions and list building, build for freKart customers.

Auto Reply (AR): An automatic response from the recipient.
Examples: “Out Of Office”, “Vacation Message”
Bounce With No Email Address (BN): BounceStudio Enterprise determined that the message was a bounce, but it could not resolve the original email recipient email address. Rare.

Challenge-Response Message (CR): Challenge-Response email systems were created as a reaction to the increasing circulation of spam. Dubbed as a 100% effective solution to stopping spam from ever reaching users’ inboxes, Challenge-Response systems like EarthLink SpamBlocker and SpamArrest, among others, require human intervention for an email message to reach its intended recipient.

In short, a Challenge-Response message is an automatic response from the recipient, requesting that the sender confirm a real person is sending the message. Generally, confirmation is completed manually by clicking on a hyperlink within the Challenge-Response message itself.

When BounceStudio Enterprise determines a message is a Challenge-Response type message, the email address that is returned is the FROM: email address of the system, or person, sending the Challenge-Response message to you. It’s been our experience that the original email address of the recipient does not appear within the Challenge-Response message, thus there is no way to retrieve the original email address. You’ll be handling these types of messages manually, because that’s what they’re designed for, so it should be okay that the original email address isn’t returned.

General Bounce (GB): The email server could not deliver your email message, but the bounce message was unclear as to what kind of bounce it was. Most BounceStudio Enterprise users treat these as soft bounces.
Example: “Subject: Undeliverable mail”
Hard Bounce (HB): The email server could not deliver your email message.
Example: “550 User Unknown”
Mail Block – General (MB): Indicates that the recipient’s email server is blocking email from your email server.
Example: “550 Message REFUSED by peer”
Mail Block – Known Spammer (MBKS): Indicates that the recipient’s email server is blocking email from your email server because it believes you are a known spammer.
Example: “REJECT Known SPAM source”
Mail Block – Spam Detected (MBSD): Indicates that the recipient’s email server is blocking email from your email server because the message appears to have content that looks like spam.
Example: “550 Possible spam detected”
Mail Block – Attachment Detected (MBAD): Indicates that the recipient’s email server is blocking email from your email server because the email message contained an attachment.
Example: “552 Disapproved attachment”
Mail Block – Relay Denied (MBRD): Indicates that the recipient’s email server is blocking email from your email server.
Example: “551 relaying denied”
Non Bounce (NB): BounceStudio Enterprise determined that the message was not a bounce. This could be a recipient reply, or maybe a bounce format that BounceStudio Enterprise did not recognize.

Soft Bounce – General (SB): The email server is temporarily unable to deliver your message to the recipient email address.
Example: “Connection timed out.”
Soft Bounce – Dns Failure (SBDF): The email server is temporarily unable to deliver your message to the recipient email address because of a DNS problem.
Example: “Host is unreachable”
Soft Bounce – Mailbox Full (SBMF): The email server is temporarily unable to deliver your message to the recipient email address because the recipient’s email box is full.
Example: “Mailbox over quota”
Soft Bounce – Message Size Too Large (SBMS): The email server could not deliver your message to the recipient because the message size is too large.
Example: “Exceeded maximum inbound message size”
Subscribe Request (SR): Someone is requesting to be added to your opt-in email list. BounceStudio Enterprise looks for subscribe requests in the subject header of the email message, and on the first line of a text based email message. BounceStudio Enterprise parses for subscribe requests in several different 7-bit ascii langauges. (ie. English, Spanish, French, German, etc.)

Transient Bounce (TB): The email server temporarily can not deliver your message, but it is still trying.
Examples: “Warning: message still undelivered after 4 hours. Will keep trying until message is 2 days old”
Unsubscribe Request (UR): Recipient is requesting to be removed from future email from you. BounceStudio Enterprise looks for unsubscribe/remove requests in the subject header of the email message, and on the first line of a text based email message. BounceStudio Enterprise parses for unsubscribe requests in several different 7-bit ascii langauges. (ie. English, Spanish, French, German, etc.)

5 Tips on Catchy, memorable domain name

 website-domain-names-cloud-300x163
1. Catchy, Short and memorable! You should also make your name easy to pronounce and spell. At times word that may not make sense can be innovative as domain names.
2. Avoid something too similar to competing domain names and make sure not to violate someone else’s trademark to registered famous names.
3. ”.COM” – The ”.com” is the most popular top-level domain, and it can be very tuff and difficult to find one that is available. In most cases, you should favor a ”.com.”
However, if you are planning to sell in a specific country, only you should consider a country specific domain such as “.in or .co.in” for the India. Such domain extensions are favorite for Google and other search engines.
4. Brand name vs. Discoverable: What’s your strategy? Entirely, relying on traffic from search engines? Then you should use real words and phrases like softwaresuggest.com that people are searching for to increase your search ranking. If your marketing focus is on paid search listing, banner ads and buzz building, you should come up with a brandable name like frekart.com that people will remember.
5. Be imaginative: Most single-word domains are taken, and you might need to create your personal word.
Try mixing two whole words (You Tube), (Micro-soft), (flip kart), (snap deal) tweaking a word (freKart) or making up a unique name (takn).